Detective Sergeant David W. Hubbard

October 16, 1943 – September 16, 1980

Det./Sgt. David W. Hubbard died as a result of injuries received in a car-train accident. He was assigned to the Special Investigation Unit which was involved in the surveillance of suspects believed to be responsible for a series of professional burglaries and other felonies in Saginaw County.

Sergeant Hubbard’s surveillance team was actively following a suspect on a dreary, rainy night on wet, slippery roads near Saginaw. Because of hazy, misty conditions which caused poor visibility, the team lost contact with the suspect vehicle it was following. During hurried and covert efforts to re-establish contact with the suspect vehicle, Sergeant Hubbard attempted to cross a set of railroad tracks which were hidden by a row of trees and were marked only by unlighted crossbars. Stop signs marking the railroad tracks had been removed by the County Road Commission approximately two months previously.

Witnesses to the accident did not see any brake lights before Sergeant Hubbard’s vehicle collided with the engine of the train. When his team could not contact him, they retraced his route and located the accident. Despite valiant attempts to save his life, Sergeant Hubbard died approximately half-an-hour later at the local hospital.

Sergeant Hubbard was the 33rd MSP officer to die in the line of duty.

Detective Sergeant Harry A. Sorenson

May 23, 1936 – December 5, 1978

Det./Sgt. Harry A. Sorenson was killed in a two car, head-on traffic accident near Michigamme.

Sergeant Sorenson was driving eastbound on US-41 when his unmarked car apparently crossed the center line and struck a westbound vehicle head-on.

Sergeant Sorenson received fatal injuries in the collision, and the three occupants of the other car received varying degrees of injury, none fatal.

Sergeant Sorenson was the 32nd MSP officer to die in the line of duty.

Trooper Norman R. Killough

August 15, 1953 – October 7, 197

Tpr. Norman R. Killough was accidentally shot and killed in Flint, Michigan, while serving as an undercover officer during a stolen property “sting,” investigation.

Trooper Killough was involved in an on-going State Police/Flint Police Department undercover operation in which the two departments were attempting to establish the credibility of the undercover troopers as fences for stolen goods. Trooper Killough and his partner, another trooper, acting as criminals, were in a van that was stopped by Flint officers in a high crime area of the city.

During the second of these stops by the same Flint officers, Trooper Killough was fatally wounded when a gun held by one of the Flint officers accidentally discharged with the .38 caliber bullet striking the undercover officer in the right side. Although emergency treatment was quickly administered, Trooper Killough was pronounced dead on arrival at a local hospital.

Trooper Killough was the 31st MSP officer to die in the line of duty.

Trooper Larry L. Forreider

September 23, 1941 – December 5, 1974

Tpr. Larry L. Forreider was shot to death near Alpena, Michigan, after he and his partner had stopped a vehicle for defective tail lights.

Trooper Forreider, the driver of the patrol car, approached the driver side of the suspect vehicle as his partner approached the passenger side. Trooper Forreider’s partner then advised him that he had seen a gun in the car. The occupants were ordered out of the vehicle. Two of the occupants exited on the passenger’s side and were being searched when two shots rang out from the driver’s side of the car. Trooper Forreider fell back from the car, having been mortally wounded by the driver who had obtained a second weapon from within the vehicle.

Although he was to die where he fell, Trooper Forredier returned fire at his assailant, but his shots were ineffective. The other officer captured the two passengers, wounding one of them. The murderer escaped, only to take his own life in a remote portion of Alpena County as pursuing troopers closed in on him. The three were wanted for safe burglaries, as well as other felonies, both in and out of the state of Michigan.

Trooper Forreider was the 30th MSP officer to die in the line of duty.

Trooper Darryl M. Rantanen

November 12, 1937 – May 27, 1974

Tpr. Darryl M. Rantanen was killed in a traffic accident while involved in the chase of a stolen automobile.

Trooper Rantanen and his partner were pursuing a stolen car occupied by two youths, after being alerted by Escanaba police. Trooper Rantanen’s partner, the driver of the patrol car, attempted to pull alongside the stolen car. Before the patrol car could be brought alongside the fleeing vehicle, the driver swerved across the centerline forcing the patrol unit off the roadway. Both vehicles left the roadway with the patrol unit turning on to its side and its top striking a tree. The stolen car skidded back across the roadway and came to rest in the ditch on the opposite side. The occupants then fled.

Trooper Rantanen was pronounced dead at a local hospital. His partner, seriously injured, remained under hospital and medical care for six months. The driver of the stolen car, later apprehended, was convicted in Delta County Circuit Court and was sentenced to terms of 4-1/2 to 15 years for involuntary manslaughter and 4-1/2 to 10 years for intent to do great bodily harm to the other officer.

Trooper Rantanen was the 29th MSP officer to die in the line of duty.

Trooper Steven B. Devries

April 28, 1940 – October 12, 1972

Tpr. Steven B. DeVries was shot and killed by a bank robber near Niles, Michigan.

At 8:40 a.m., the Niles Post received a bank alarm in the city of Niles. The information was immediately given to Trooper DeVries, who was already on patrol. A short time later, Trooper DeVries radioed the post requesting further information. None was available. Other officers responding to the robbery observed Trooper DeVries on bypass US-12. He had stopped a vehicle containing one subject and was sitting in the patrol car talking on the radio.

A witness later appeared and stated that he had seen Trooper DeVries and the subject standing between their respective cars when, suddenly, the officer fell backward with his arm across his chest. The witness immediately contacted other troopers in the area and aid was rushed to the fallen officer. An ambulance transported Trooper DeVries to a local hospital within minutes. The medical staff worked feverishly, but unsuccessfully, to save the officer’s life. Trooper DeVries was pronounced dead at 9:10 a.m., one-half hour after he had been informed of the robbery.

Investigating officers found that Trooper DeVries had written the subject’s name and address on a note pad. The suspect was later apprehended, admitted to both the bank robbery and murder, was convicted and sentenced to life imprisonment in the Southern Michigan Prison at Jackson. On July 4, 1987, Trooper DeVries’ killer escaped from that institution. On December 3, 1987, he was killed in a gun battle with sheriff deputies in Mississippi, while fleeing from another bank robbery.

Trooper DeVries was the 28th MSP officer to die in the line of duty.

Trooper Charles B. Stark

April 24, 1939 – December 31, 1971

Tprs. Gary T. Rampy and Charles B. Stark were shot and killed during the traffic stop of a suspected drunk driver.

At 2:30 a.m., the officers resumed patrol following a coffee break with fellow troopers from another patrol car. They had been discussing drunk drivers. At 2:55 a.m., a citizen called the post advising that the officers had been shot. It is theorized that at 2:50 a.m., the troopers’ attention was drawn to a vehicle making a u-turn in front of them. It was later learned that when the officers signaled the vehicle to stop, the driver obtained a gun from the back seat and placed it in his waistband.

When the officers approached the car, the driver was unable to produce an operator’s license and was taken back to the patrol car by one of the troopers. While at the patrol car, the suspect apparently got the drop on Trooper Rampy. Trooper Stark was then called back to the patrol car and he, too, was disarmed.

The suspect then shot both officers. Although pronounced dead on arrival at a nearby hospital, both troopers died as they fell beside their patrol car.  Nearby residents heard the shooting and called the post. The officers that had just completed the coffee break with the mortally wounded troopers were less than one mile from the scene, and arrived in time to observe the suspect vehicle as it was leaving the area. Shots fired at the fleeing car had no effect. During the chase, information was given to the post reference the fallen officers and an ambulance was sent. A shotgun blast was fired, striking the suspect vehicle, and the driver stopped. He fled on foot after attempting to fire at the pursuing troopers. One of the officers chased the suspect on foot and ordered him to stop. After repeated warnings, the suspect was fired upon and killed.

It was learned that the suspect was wanted in Tennessee for parole violations, had been linked with several armed robberies, and had killed one person in a drug store hold up.

Trooper Rampy was the 26th MSP officer to die in the line of duty.

Trooper Stark was the 27th MSP officer to die in the line of duty.

Trooper Gary T. Rampy

September 12, 1944 – December 31, 1971

Tprs. Gary T. Rampy and Charles B. Stark were shot and killed during the traffic stop of a suspected drunk driver.

At 2:30 a.m., the officers resumed patrol following a coffee break with fellow troopers from another patrol car. They had been discussing drunk drivers. At 2:55 a.m., a citizen called the post advising that the officers had been shot. It is theorized that at 2:50 a.m., the troopers’ attention was drawn to a vehicle making a u-turn in front of them. It was later learned that when the officers signaled the vehicle to stop, the driver obtained a gun from the back seat and placed it in his waistband.

When the officers approached the car, the driver was unable to produce an operator’s license and was taken back to the patrol car by one of the troopers. While at the patrol car, the suspect apparently got the drop on Trooper Rampy. Trooper Stark was then called back to the patrol car and he, too, was disarmed.

The suspect then shot both officers. Although pronounced dead on arrival at a nearby hospital, both troopers died as they fell beside their patrol car.  Nearby residents heard the shooting and called the post. The officers that had just completed the coffee break with the mortally wounded troopers were less than one mile from the scene, and arrived in time to observe the suspect vehicle as it was leaving the area. Shots fired at the fleeing car had no effect. During the chase, information was given to the post reference the fallen officers and an ambulance was sent. A shotgun blast was fired, striking the suspect vehicle, and the driver stopped. He fled on foot after attempting to fire at the pursuing troopers. One of the officers chased the suspect on foot and ordered him to stop. After repeated warnings, the suspect was fired upon and killed.

It was learned that the suspect was wanted in Tennessee for parole violations, had been linked with several armed robberies, and had killed one person in a drug store hold up.

Trooper Rampy was the 26th MSP officer to die in the line of duty.

Trooper Stark was the 27th MSP officer to die in the line of duty.

Trooper Rodger M. Adams

March 6, 1945 – May 14, 1971

Tpr. Rodg er M. Adams w as killed in a traffic crash on US-12 in Lenawee County.

Shortly after 1:15 a.m., Trooper Adams and his partner were dispatched to investigate a traffic crash. Approximately one-half mile west of Tipton Highway, an oncoming car skidded around a curve and crossed the centerline of the roadway.  Trooper Adams swerved the patrol car to the right, but was unable to avoid the oncoming car. The two vehicles met nearly head-on. Trooper Adams was killed instantly and his partner was seriously injured.  The driver of the other vehicle was also killed.

Trooper Adams w as the 25th MSP officer to die in the line of duty.

Trooper Carl P. Lindberg

September 22, 1946 – May 26, 1969

Tpr. Carl P. Lindberg was shot and killed when he confronted an armed robber in the apartment complex in which he lived.

One of the apartment tenants contacted Trooper Lindberg and stated she had been talking to the manager of the complex when their conversation had been interrupted by two men breaking into the manager’s office announcing a holdup.

Trooper Lindberg, armed with his snubnosed revolver, accompanied the tenant to the office. Upon hearing no sounds within the office, the tenant went to the terrace where she heard voices. The tenant then knocked on the office window in an attempt to frighten the robbers. Both suspects fled through a side door. One of them ran down the hallway toward the lobby, encountering Trooper Lindberg. The subject shot the off-duty officer at point blank range and fled to a get-away car. Trooper Lindberg, though mortally wounded, chased the second subject and fired five shots at him before falling to the ground. Both robbers escaped at the time, but were subsequently apprehended, and received mandatory life sentences for their crime.

Trooper Lindberg was the 24th MSP officer to die in the line of duty.